Sorted By Manufacturer


Kaweco’s Valentine’s Special

Recently, my wife told me about the following Valentine’s Special from Kaweco China. As I haven’t seen anything about this set yet in the West I thought I share the details with you.

It includes a pen for her (in the Strawberry Pink colour) and one for him either blue or green.

Kaweco’s Valentine Set for China (Image © Kaweco)

Her pen comes can be used as a clutch pencil or you can insert the included ‘ballpoint pen lead’ to make it into a ballpoint. His is a fountain pen and you can pick from two colours, which look like the Retro Blue and Industrial Green I have shown in a previous blog post about Kaweco’s special colours for China, Taiwan, Macao and HongKong.

Early orders will get some additional postcards from America’s Rifle Paper Co.

The set also comes with a leather case and costs ¥520 (~$80; €65; £58).


Price and exchange rates: January 2018

I believe that the use of Kaweco’s image shown in this blog post falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.


Noblesse De Mine

Sabine Syfuss-Arnaud published another pencil-related article in the leading French business magazine Challenges. I didn’t know what kind of article this one would become, but it looks great.

The magazine is out now.

I can’t resist writing this: Faber-Castell has a silver pocket pencil from 1890. A photo of that pocket pencil would have fitted so well with this article.


Staedtler’s new 925 15 mechanical pencil 9

 

Today: a quick look at Staedtler’s new 925 15 mechanical pencil. Another pencil I got to know from Gunther.

The 925 15 came out in November 2017, has an official price of ¥500 (~$4.40; £3.30; €3.75) and is available in 0.3mm, 0.5mm, 0.7mm and 0.9mm.

In my opinion, it looks absolutely stunning. The grip section is made from Elastomer. One thing to note: as it is rather rubbery little bits of fibre or dust will easily stick to the grip section.

The push button looks quite different to the push button found on other members of Staedtler’s 925 family. By the way, I have no idea how the numbers after 925, in this case, 15, are assigned. They don’t seem to be in chronological order, but they also don’t seem to indicate how cheap or expensive the pen is. The 925 15 has a much smaller push button than its relatives and comes with a hole. I couldn’t think of any practical use for the hole (checking whether the eraser is used up?) – the only reason I could think of was the same reason why pen caps have holes, so that air can flow in case anyone (most likely children) swallow the cap and it is stuck in the windpipe. ジムキング confirmed that this is the most likely reason for the hole in the push button.

Here’s a family photo with some other 925s.

Top to bottom: 900 25, 925 15, 925 25, 925 35, 925 65, 925 85

The 925 15 is so nice, it deserves a centrefold picture. If it was a bit heavier and had a sliding sleeve it would probably become my daily mechanical pencil.


Challenges 3

Recently, I had the pleasure of talking to Sabine Syfuss-Arnaud, a journalist from the leading French business magazine Challenges. She was writing an article about Faber-Castell and its new CEO Daniel Rogger.

We talked about his plans for China and the factories in Germany, Brazil and China. You might have guessed that I had to mention Staedtler in that conversation (of course) before we talked about what makes the best pencils and other topics.

Challenges N°545 – 7 Décembre 2017

Her article is out now (Challenges N°545 – 7 Décembre 2017).


Stationery Factlets: Staedtler Noris digital

Welcome to the first post in a new series on this blog: Stationery Factlets1. This new series was actually born out of necessity. You might remember my current lack of time. To enable me to post with minimal effort I thought of adding this series where I present small bits of information. Many readers will know some or most of these factlets, but you might be surprised by the occasional fact that is new to you or you might be reminded of old bits of information you have started forgetting.

An early picture of the Noris Digital with the Samsung logo. New versions don’t have it anymore.  (Image © Staedtler)

OK, here’s the first factlet.

Staedtler’s Noris digital, their digital pen for Samsung tablets, works with many EMR (electromagnetic resonance) devices (EMR is one of several technologies that makes digital pens work), so it can actually also be used with many WACOM pen tablets (…but because of Staedtler’s current cooperation with Samsung Staedtler’s marketing material only makes reference to Samsung devices).


The images in this blog post have been taken from Staedtler web sites. I believe that the use of the images shown in this blog post falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.

I would like to thank Benedikt Schindler for the information about the Noris digital presented in this blog post.

 

Noris digital (Image © Staedtler)

  1. The term factoid has two meaning, so I decided to go with factlet, even though the term factoid is more common. []