Author Archives : memm


Lego erasers (again)

The Lego erasers by Senator (€0.75 each)

The Lego erasers by Senator (€0.75 each)

Lego erasers from China and Germany

The non-Senator Lego erasers (£2 each)

The non-Senator Lego erasers (£2 each)

I have mentioned the Lego erasers in two previous posts: The first Lego erasers where made by Senator in Germany. When they moved production to China the erasers got much more expensive, rising from €1.49 for two to £7.95 for four1. They got cheaper now (£2.99 for four), but the Chinese made Lego erasers are still more expensive than the German made ones were – unless you get lucky, like I did, and get them on offer. In my case it was on offer because the supermarket wants to get rid of their stock. I paid £1.49 (~$2.22; €2.06) for a pack of four.

The Lego Movie erasers (£0.75 each)

The Lego Movie erasers (£0.75 each)

The version I got is being sold as part of the Lego Movie franchise – but as far as I can tell there’s no difference between the normal Lego erasers and the Logo Movie erasers, except the colours.

 

Performance

To compare the erasers I used Banditapple 3G paper and a Simbalion pencil. Performance wise the Lego Movie erasers are pretty good. You might have read in previous blog posts that I prefer dust free erasers. The Lego erasers performed as well as or even a bit better than a Mono dust free eraser (a dust free eraser, but not one of the best dust free erasers).

legomovie-erasers

Looks

This eraser has much stronger sprue and flow marks than the Senator eraser did. Unfortunately I can’t take a comparison photo as I have given my Senator erasers away (I think to Hen from Rad and Hungry).

legomovie-all

The sprue marks are quite obvious

 

Overall

For the price I have paid these are excellent erasers. Performance for a not dust free eraser is excellent.

Comparison Lego / Mono dust free eraser

Comparison Lego / Mono dust free eraser


Prices: April 2010, January 2012, February 2015

Exchange rates: March 2015

  1. They were more very expensive in the UK, I’m not sure about the situation in other countries []

Blog and Monocle 2

Blog

You might have noticed that the look of this blog has changed a lot in the last days. The theme that I have used until recently wasn’t working any more as it should, at least not in new versions of WordPress1, because it hasn’t been updated by its developers for several years. I have switched to another theme. I still miss my old theme (I guess you do, too) and if I find a nicer theme I might switch again, but for now this is the best I could come up with.

How Bleistift used to look like

How Bleistift used to look like

Monocle - Issue 81Monocle

No, not the Gentleman’s single-use unlubricated monocle, but Issue 81 of the magazine called Monocle. When I went to the supermarket I noticed that the latest issue, a Japan special, also features an article about pens and pencils in Japan. Unfortunately you can’t read this article online, but (as a consolation) here’s a link to their video report about Staedtler.

  1. WordPress is the name of the blog softare I use []

Other uses for cedar wood 7

Pencils obviously aren’t the only use for cedar wood. Here’s an interesting other use: protect clothing from moth damage. Aromatic oils from the red cedar are said to kill moth larvae.

Red cedar wood from Arkansas

Red cedar wood from Arkansas

Red cedar is actually not exactly the same wood as the one used for making pencils. The red cedar is actually a juniper, but it is, like the pencil cedar, part of the cypress family.

I bought this pack of two hooks for £3.49 (~ $5.25; €4.95) in my local HomeSense.


Price and exchange rates: March 2015


Noris colour wear and tear 2

Introduction

Here’s my first follow up post about the Noris colour, the coloured pencil made using Wopex material, which has been mentioned in a previous blog post. I bought my set of six Noris colour for £2.49 (~$3.76; €3.46) on eBay. There are also sets with 12 and with 24 pencils available.

As explained earlier I have been looking for a coloured pencil, one that is suitable for writing, for quite a while now. The Noris colour is one of the best pencils for this purpose I have seen so far.

The Noris colour pencils have arrived

The Noris colour pencils have arrived

 The test

Now this is not a scientific exploration of how fast the lead will wear down, I have neither equipment nor experience, but just to give you some rough idea what I did:

  • The average normal pen force used to write the sample lines was approximately 1 Newton. I don’t know the average axial pen force. There was obviously a lot of variation as I wrote by hand – with more force being used for downward strokes. As you can see the point broke a few times. It would be great to have a pencil hardness tester, like the Elcometer, to make these tests more objective1.
  • All pencils were sharpened using the Deli 0668, i.e. with an angle of approximately 20°. The Deli was dialled back one full rotation (360°) do avoid creating a point that will break too easily.
  • The paper used was from a Brunnen – Der grüne Block (previously seen in this post)
Old and new Noris coloured pencils. The old ones didn't take part in the comparison.

Old and new Noris coloured pencils. The old ones didn’t take part in the comparison.

Before

All pencils, the Noris colour, the Eberhard Faber 1410 and the Noris club 144, had an initial line thickness of 0.1 mm – 0.3 mm (vertical / horizontal variation).

 

After

The point of the Noris colour wore down the least. After one line of writing the line variation was 0.3 mm – 0.5 mm.

The point of the Eberhard Faber 1410 wore down the most. After one line of writing the line variation was 0.5 mm – 0.6 mm.

The point wear of the Noris club 144 was in the middle. After one line of writing the line variation was 0.3 mm – 0.6 mm.

noriscolour-comparison

 

Conclusion

The Noris colour performed best. Subjectively the point felt better than what the numbers suggest, but then the Noris is also the pencil that left the lightest mark. The Eberhard Faber 1410which wore down fastest left the strongest marks on paper.

Despite the light marks the Noris colour is in my opinion the best pencil for writing or marking. It is also easy to erase.


Price Noris colour: February 2015.

I bought the Brunnen notepad in August 2011 in McPaper, Schweinfurt (Germany) for €1.19 (~$1.29; £0.86).

I bought the Noris Club pencil in 2008 from Woolworths went they into administration. I don’t remember the price.

I bought the Eberhard Faber pencils in 2010. More information about them can be found in this blog post.

Exchange rates: March 2015.

  1. They’re actually supposed to the the surface you scratch with the pencils, not the pencils themselves. I guess I should either start a Kickstarter (think potato salad) to try to get my hand on a pencil hardness tester or try to build my own one. []